Persephone Acquiesced

So swift is summer season laid to rest

As August heat browns the fronds of deer fern

On cue, soft green to crimson colors crest


Golden moon risen low, a signal of harvest

That which begun, now taken in return

So swift is summer season laid to rest


Light faded, Persephone acquiesced

Her absence, Demeter’s ancient tears spurn

On cue, soft green to crimson colors crest


Frost, the unwelcome early-morning guest

Contrasting oak leaves’ hue of deep auburn

So swift is summer season laid to rest


Final descent thus ends the mortal quest

From lively pursuits, nature does adjourn

On cue, soft green to crimson colors crest


For then the season’s duties are addressed

Though beneath ivory coat we may yearn

So swift is summer season laid to rest

On cue, soft green to crimson colors crest

This poem is a villanelle, which utilizes a prescribed rhyme scheme, as well as refrain repetition. It also imposes a structure. This was a difficult, yet fun one to write. I wrote it a few years ago and workshopped it with the Shoreline Cluster of Poets.

Fiction, poetry

WattPad and FanStory

I’m new to using both of these sites that I’ve been meaning to use for a really long time. What can I say? Other things had to happen first. But I want to share with you that I’m now active on both.



This is where I’ll post serial fiction. Right now, I’m working on Pathogen, a story I’ve been meaning to write and share for a long time. While my main fiction focus is on historical literary works, what I post on WattPad will be just for fun, for us to enjoy together. Because of that, I’m sorry to say–I’ll only be posting about 1,000 words or so each month.

Even with that pace, we can unfold stories there together, writer and readers. I just published this month’s section, which I originally wrote years ago as part of my MA program–but I wanted to give it a once over before publishing it and now I finally had the opportunity. Look for the story to continue next month!

Start reading Pathogen today.


This is where I’ll post short fiction and poetry. My main goal here, in addition to connecting with other writers, is to participate in contests. I started posting yesterday, and FanStory only allows me to post two things each day, so there are only four right now. But here’s what you can read if you head over there today:

  • “Dept. of Reformation,” a pastiche of Jenny Offil’s book, Dept. of Speculation
  • “The Coach,” a short story told only in dialogue, no dialogue tags or quotation marks.
  • “In Memoriam J.G.M.,” a pastiche of Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “In Memoriam A.H.H.”
  • “Land of the Gods,” a poem I wrote after the earthquake, tidal wave, and nuclear meltdown in Japan

Update: After a few days of use, I’ve decided not to participate on FanStory. I’ve removed the above listed posts and I will share them here next week, along with others I’d posted to that site. 


I welcome feedback on both of these sites, so if you’re a member, please feel free to share your thoughts on these and any other pieces I share. Happy reading!

patreon, poetry, polls, Writing Life

Supporting Writers

Last summer, a friend and fellow-writer told me about Patreon. It’s a crowd-funding site designed to support artists. I signed up, thinking it’d be the perfect place to share my creative journey in writing and crafts. However, the combination of those two passions soon proved too confusing for patron rewards and posting, and I shut it down to regroup.

This spring, I relaunched my Patreon, with a focus on writing only. Patron rewards are for everyone, and at higher tiers, split into readers and writers to ensure that all can receive something meaningful in gratitude for supporting my work.

You can click the link above, click “Donate” in the navigation menu, or watch the video below to learn more about the rewards and how to become a patron.

If you’re a creator who would like to try out Patreon for yourself, please feel free to use my invite code and then we can both get additional support.

Why Patreon?

A long time ago, artists were able to feed themselves because of patrons. Now, they have to be sales people in order to make money off of a finished product that can take years to produce. But, with Patreon, that can change—and it’s not all about the money. Becoming a patron means taking part in someone’s creative process. I’m a patron myself, because I believe in supporting those who want to contribute to the arts.

Are You Already on Patreon?

If you’re a creator, I’d love to connect! Comment below to share your Patreon, or contact me directly.